Sesamoid Injuries of the Foot

While most bones in the body are connected to each other, there are several that are embedded within a tendon or a muscle called sesamoids. In your foot, these small, pea-shaped bones are found in the underside of the forefoot, just beneath the big toe joint.

The purpose of the sesamoids is to act like a pulley—providing a smooth surface to allow the tendons to slide and help the big toe move normally. By doing this, it helps provide leverage when the big toe pushes off during walking and running, while also assisting as a weightbearing surface for the first metatarsal bone.

There are three types of sesamoid injuries in the foot, which can involve the bones, tendons and/or surrounding tissue in the joint.

Common Symptoms of Sesamoid Injuries:

In diagnosing a sesamoid injury, your podiatrist will perform a physical examination of the foot, focusing on the big toe joint to see if you can move it up and down without an increase in pain. In many cases, x-rays will be ordered to rule out a possible fracture.

Treatment for sesamoid injuries is usually non-invasive and includes:

If conservative measures fail, however, your podiatrist may recommend surgery to remove the sesamoid bone.

If you or someone you know believes they may have a sesamoid injury, it’s important to see a podiatrist as soon as possible. Our podiatrists are experts in all areas of foot and ankle care, and will be happy to assist you with any problems you may be experiencing. Feel free to contact our office at (248)348-5300 or request an appointment on our website.

Author
Associated Podiatrists PC

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